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Aural Delights No 160 James Morrow and Jason Sandford

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  • #10238

    Coming Up This Week 00:00

    Interview: Dee Cunniffe 03:20

    Fact: Fiction Film Talk by Rod Barnett 19:30

    Writer Interview: James Morrow 25:40

    Main Fiction: Bigfoot and the Bodhisattva by James Morrow 41:48

    Fact: Narrating Bigfoot and the Bodhisattva by Larry Santoro 02:01:01

    Fact Article: Science News by J.J. Campanella 02:05:45

    Serial: Sublimation Angels Pt 3 by Jason Sanford 02:27:20

    Artist Interview: Ben Wootten 03:05:30

    Promo: Enemy Lines 02:13:39

    Narrators: Larry Santoro

    Main Fiction: Bigfoot and the Bodhisattva first appeared at Conjunctions

    White Cloud Worlds Blog

    Buy White Cloud Worlds from links below:

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    MightyApe

    #10239

    Gonzalo
    Moderator

    That cover. W O W


    #10240

    Josh Leuze
    Keymaster

    Gonzalo said:
    That cover. W O W

    I know, that cover is awesome! I hope this is just the beginning of Snow Beast Month 🙂

    #10241

    gav
    Member

    HA HA. I love that cover. Though quite why the Dalai Lama is smiling (other than that is what he does) while the soldiers are being chewed on is completely beyond me.

    #10242

    LarrySantoro
    Member

    I believe you may view the image overlooking the scene to be the Essence of Dalai Lama, a representation of the spirit of the tale. In any event, that seems to be the image of the current Lama, not the one in the tale who, as you know, is both young and moon-faced and has “the brightest smile in Asia.” In any event, the soldiers aren’t being chewed on, they are being humanely “glocked” by the Yeti and will awake soon after. The climber who is receiving the sha suspah is already dead. Well, mostly dead.

    #10243

    carter101
    Member

    Not my favourite story, but another great narration! I did love the three-parter though, keep the serials coming…

    Is it just me or does JJ sound like he needs a hug?!

    #10244

    Julio
    Member

    Yes, the three parter was really good!

    #10245

    LarrySantoro
    Member

    Come on people. No one has anything nice — or even wildly negative — to say about Jim Morrow’s tale?

    #10246

    I liked it, actually. The humour worked for me (punny! very punny!). Timely enough, I am currently listening to some audiobooks by the current Dalai Lama, and being a well-meaning but probably very ignorant Westerner I really enjoyed the yeti perspective. It made me conscious of all the minds I have “eaten” so far in my dubious education, and what a fragmented understanding I probably have of any one of them.

    Unfortunately I do not know much about the history of Tibet, so there is probably a great deal I am missing.

    I would like to hear more stories from Morrow. Thanks, Larry!

    #10247

    Josh Leuze
    Keymaster

    LarrySantoro said:
    Come on people. No one has anything nice — or even wildly negative — to say about Jim Morrow’s tale?

    I thought it was awesome! I’ve always been a sucker for cryptozoology, it’s fun to think that somewhere out there is a hidden valley teeming with pterodactyls, mastodons, or yeti…

    This episode was an all around win. I thought the cover was cinematic, dark, and funny, it’d make a great poster. It was an excellent idea for a story, and well read of course. The only thing I thought the story was missing was the yeti eating another brain halfway through and having a big personality twist, or better yet chomping a Swiss climber’s melon and getting to listen to you try to turn the accent on a dime. 😉

    If this episode would have contained just the main fiction I’d have been tickled, all the interviews, nonfiction and the conclusion of Sublimation Angels were just icing on a big slice of cake that I really needed on a Friday afternoon! 😀

    #10248

    jeffdem
    Member

    I’m surprised J.J. Campanella failed to mention that the reason we haven’t found any habitable exoplanets is due to the detection methods that have been used for the past 15 years. The Kepler Space Telescope is finely tuned to detect planets in a star’s habitable zone; as data continues to come in, the number of earth-like planets is expected to soar. We also know that life may also be able to flourish on moons of giant planets well outside of a star’s habital zone. Europa, Titan, and Enceladus are candidates in our own solar system. The deeply flawed Drake Equation does not take this into account.

    #10249

    LarrySantoro
    Member

    JLeuze said:
    This episode was an all around win. I thought the cover was cinematic, dark, and funny, it’d make a great poster. It was an excellent idea for a story, and well read of course. The only thing I thought the story was missing was the yeti eating another brain halfway through and having a big personality twist, or better yet chomping a Swiss climber’s melon and getting to listen to you try to turn the accent on a dime. 😉

    When I first read it, I hoped there would be a change of brain moment for the first-Yeti narrator, but that was just me. I loved this story. I’d never read Morrow before but I picked up one of his books at World Fantasy and am looking forward to burrowing into them — as soon as I finish the WFC report for Tony which, I understand, he’s going to post very soon!

    #10250

    Josh Leuze
    Keymaster

    @larrysantoro Maybe he thought that was too heavy-handed or just too much for a short story. I was waiting for the story to go there, but I can also see how that would have taken away from the ending a bit. I haven’t read any Morrow either, what did you pick up?

    #10251

    For me the story didn’t quite grab me (lol, I sound like a rejection letter). I love the cover, and thought Larry did a great job with the narration, but I find satire hard to stomach these days. I used to like Terry Pratchett, but now I’ve just offloaded my old Discworld books.

    It did do one good thing for me though: convinced me it’s probably a bad idea to write a story with my alligator avatar in the staring role. This has been in the back of my mind for a while. Yes, I’ve heard folks say it’s not a good idea to use your D&D character etc. in your fiction, but I was thinking, but, but, my gator’s a terribly *nice* gator. 🙂 And she could be an evolved alligator, or maybe a happy snappy alien who just happened to have somewhat offensive dietary habits.
    But not being a writer of horror, there’s no escaping the fact the story would have to be a satire. And so it wouldn’t work. Not least because satire is surely very hard to do well, and so probably beyond me. And then even if I did do it well, people like me still wouldn’t like it. Hrumph.

    Which brings me on to a second point. I came across a BBC writers’ guidelines site yesterday that said something interesting. Not that I’m thinking of submitting to the Beeb, big waste of time there I’m sure. But reading guidelines for all sorts of places can sometimes be helpful.

    Anyway, these guidelines said:
    “We are looking for original short stories which work being read out loud – ie with a strong emphasis on narrative, and avoiding too much dialogue, character description, and digression.”

    And having read this it occured to me that this seems to be *the opposite* of what many of the top SF magazines are demanding these days. Many are shifting more towards character and language and literary styles. While the story is still of course important, it’s increasingly seen as *old fashioned* and old school SF to focus primarily on that.

    So, at the same time as more and more SF is being read aloud, thanks to the likes of the wondrous sofa, maybe it’s also becoming less suited to being read aloud. Better for reading, not so great for listening perhaps. Ironic.

    Or are the BBC wrong?

    #10252

    Not sure I’m agreeing with the BBC. Personally, I like listening to stories read aloud no matter what the style. Actually, great stories give great narrators a chance to really shine, so thinking back over what I have enjoyed most I think I prefer stories with dialogue and even challenging structure. Not a Sofa story, but Larry’s reading of Eugie Foster’s SINNER, BAKER, FABULIST, PRIEST… certainly comes to mind. I really appreciate what all the Sofa narrators do, and I try to pay attention to how they approach the stories they read. It makes the experience all the richer.

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